header is fixed, this is fills gap - no delete
header is fixed, this is fills gap - no delete
Daily Devotions

< return

How does this apply to me?

Posted: Monday, February 5

 Pastor Stephanie Humpa // Care Ministries Pastor

Pastor Stephanie Humpa // Care Ministries Pastor

One Year Bible Reading Guide

Exodus 21:22-23:13
Matthew 24:1-28
Psalm 29:1-11
Proverbs 7:6-23

 Verse of the day:      

“Suppose someone digs or uncovers a pit and fails to cover it, and then an ox or a donkey falls into it. The owner of the pit must pay full compensation to the owner of the animal, but then he gets to keep the dead animal.” (Exodus 21:33-34)


Have you ever read through a portion of scripture and then said to yourself, “I’m not sure how this applies to my life.”? This might be a section where you are tempted to wonder such a thing. Throughout much of today’s Old Testament Bible reading in the One Year Bible reading plan it focuses on culturally specific scenarios for that time period.  I can’t remember the last time I uncovered a pit and forget to cover it and I’m guessing you can’t either. It can be easy to gloss over these portions of scripture without asking ourselves the critical question of “how should this change me?”

 

If you look beyond the very culturally specific examples that are laid out in these chapters you will see that the heart of all these rules is to take personally responsibility when you have caused harm. Whether the harm was caused intentionally or unintentionally responsibility needs to be taken. That is something that regardless of time or culture applies to us all.

 

It can be hard to take responsibility, especially if the harm that was done was unintentional. It is easy to get defensive and try to defend your motives while ignoring the hurt or the damage our words or actions may have caused. The cultural scenarios may look differently if this were written today but we can still apply its message to our lives. As God’s children we must always take responsibility of our words and our actions. If damage has been done we must try to make amends—even when it’s emotional damage that can’t be see with a physical eye. Taking responsibility comes easier when we love God first and put others needs before ourselves.